GRANULOMA

bigran_1A granuloma of the vocal fold, or a vocal process granuloma, is an inflammatory lesion. These lesions typically occur on the back, or posterior, portion of the vocal folds.

Causes of a vocal fold granuloma may include:

  • Chronic voice overuse
  • Voice misuse
  • Intubation – placement of a breathing tube through the vocal folds can cause formation of granulomas
  • Vocal fold weakness – with strain, vocal process granuloma can occur

Symptoms of granulomas include:

  • Hoarseness
  • Rough voice
  • Vocal fatigue, or tiring with overuse
  • Chronic cough
  • Tickle in the throat

Diagnosis:
Diangosis of granuloma is made during laryngoscopy and stroboscopy.

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Granulomas on both vocal folds are noted. This occurred after this patient was intubated for a short period of time. Steroid injections were necessary to reduce the size of these growths.

Treatment for Granuloma:

A vocal fold granuloma is first treated with voice rest, often times for weeks. This causes less stress on the vocal folds, allowing granulomas to heal.

A steroid injection into the granuloma may help decrease the size of the granuloma. This may be performed as an in-office procedure.

During surgery a granuloma may be easily removed. However, granulomas often quickly recur despite excision – thus surgery is reserved only in cases where a granuloma is large enough to cause shortness of breath.

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Throatdisorder.com is an online resource for patients and physicians to learn more about common voice, swallowing, breathing and throat disorders. Throat complaints, from cough to cancer, are a common reason for patients to seek medical treatment. This website developed as a result of Dr. Sunil Verma's passions: that of education, patient care, and interest in technology.

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