TRACHEAL DILATION

Tracheal dilation is performed to enlarge the airway in cases of subglottic stenosis and tracheal stenosis. Patients with these conditions complain of shortness of breath and dilation is a minimally invasive way of enlarging the airway.

Tracheal dilation is traditionally performed with a patient asleep in the operating room. A laryngoscope is placed to view the patients vocal cords.

Specialized balloons are inserted into the area of narrowing and then expanded. The constant pressure provides controlled radial pressure to expand narrowed areas.

Also used for dilation is serial enlargement with rigid dilators or bronchoscopes. The surgeon uses progressively larger dilators to increase the size of stenosis.

Using balloon dilation surgeons able to dilate the airway of select individuals with a patient awake. Lidocaine, or a local anesthetic, is used to numb the nose, mouth and throat. An endoscope is placed through a patient nose to identify the area of narrowing. A balloon is placed through the nose and through the area of narrowing. Water is used to fill the balloon which stretches the narrowing.

Tracheal dilation may not provide permanent results, and may not be successful for patients with long standing scars.

For cases in which tracheal dilation is not adequate, a tracheal resection or laryngotracheal reconstruction may be required.

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Throatdisorder.com is an online resource for patients and physicians to learn more about common voice, swallowing, breathing and throat disorders. Throat complaints, from cough to cancer, are a common reason for patients to seek medical treatment. This website developed as a result of Dr. Sunil Verma's passions: that of education, patient care, and interest in technology.

NOTE : The information presented on this site is for educational purposes only, and is not intended to replace consultation with a qualified physician. It may not be appropriate to your individual case, and should not be used in making treatment decisions, especially with regard to medication. Considerable effort is made to ensure that the information on this site is accurate, but medicine is a changing field, and this website is not responsible for errors or omissions. Use of this website acknowledges the above.

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